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Older workers 'bearing the brunt' of health problems linked to workplace stress

The 2013 national wellbeing figures have shown a tiny jump in satisfaction levels across the UK. But research reveals that older workers may be feeling more strain than other age groups.

The national survey found that the proportion of people rating their life satisfaction as seven or more out of ten rose by a modest 1.1 per cent on last year to 77 per cent, according to the Office for National Statistics.

The same data found that people aged 45 to 54 were the most dissatisfied with their lot. This seems to tally with separate research from Canada Life Group that indicated that older workers were 'bearing the brunt' of health problems associated with workplace stress.

More than two out of five people aged 51 to 55 blamed workplace stress directly for an illness that they had developed. Older workers were found to have less access to the kinds of benefits that could improve their health, such as gym membership. Of workers who blamed their jobs for weight gain, it was those aged 51 to 65 who said they'd put on most pounds.

As the UK workforce gets older, employers would do well to pay more attention to their older workers, who may need particular support to stay happy and healthy - and productive.

Acas has published pdf  Age and the workplace: a guide for employers and employees [336kb], which outlines key information about your obligations when it comes to age-related employment legislation. Training is also available on Health, work and wellbeing and Stress to help you maintain a healthy, well-functioning workforce, whatever the age.

Visit the Acas Training and Business Solutions page for more information.

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