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Public sector workers figure highly in unpaid overtime stats

In 2012, one in five UK workers regularly did more than their contracted hours without being paid for it, notching up a grand total of 1.8 billion hours of free work over the year. This was worth more than £5,600 a year per person and added £28.3 billion to the British economy, according to research by the TUC.

The analysis identified some professions that regularly featured unpaid overtime. It found that more than half of health and social services managers (51 per cent), teaching and educational professionals (52.4 per cent), research and development managers (54.5 per cent), and financial institution managers (60.5 per cent) put in unpaid overtime. The financial managers did the most extra work, grinding out an average of 11.4 hours of unpaid overtime a week, though this time may have been offset by bonus payments.

Teachers were the next most hard-working, doing on average 11.1 hours of unpaid overtime each week. The TUC said that there had been a sharp rise in unpaid overtime among public sector employees, who were more likely to work extra hours for free than their private sector counterparts. It said that public sector job losses had increased the workloads of those who had stayed in work.

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