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Huge fall in the number of working days lost to disputes over redundancies

There has been a dramatic fall in the number of working days lost because of disputes over redundancy, according to figures released by the Office for National Statistics.

In 2009, more than 60 per cent of working days lost to stoppages were due to disputes over redundancy issues. The following year, this had risen to 85 per cent.

But in 2011, only 3 per cent of days lost were due to redundancy problems. Instead, 95 per cent of days lost were down to disputes over pay.

Over the last ten years, pay has been the principal cause of working days lost, except for 2009 and 2010 when redundancy dominated. The latest figures are a return to the historical pattern.

Some 275,000 working days were lost due to redundancy issues in 2009, rising to 312,000 in 2010. But in 2011, the figure had fallen to 48,000.

However, the total number of days lost was substantially up in 2011 compared to previous years. This was due to three large public sector stoppages, which accounted for 90 per cent of the days lost, out of an overall total of 149 public and private stoppages.

Although 1.39 million working days were lost last year, it is nowhere near the 12.9 million days that were lost on average every year during the 1970s.

Acas has extensive knowledge and experience in resolving disputes, and can provide detailed advice and guidance as well as practical training on Redundancy issues. Visit Pay and reward: how Acas can help in the Acas Training and Business Solutions area for more information.

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